shark

Scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini) travels more than 1,200 km from Golfo Dulce, Costa Rica’s South Pacific, to the iconic Darwin Arch in the Galapagos Islands, Ecuador.

December 3, 2021- Like the jaguars that inhabit the tropical rainforests of different Central American countries, scalloped hammerhead sharks transit through large marine areas of Costa Rica, Panama, Colombia, and Ecuador. Such is the case of “Banco”, a male scalloped hammerhead shark tagged at the Golfo Dulce Shark Sanctuary in southern Costa Rica in August 2017 that was detected 1,200 km at the Galapagos Marine Reserve in Ecuador four years later in March 2021.

The Galapagos Bullhead Shark Project

Heterodontus quoyi goes by many names: in English it is known as the Galapagos Bullhead shark or the Peruvian Horn Shark (the latter because of it’s spines in front the first and second dorsal fin). It is one of the most elusive species of sharks that has recently come into the attention of researchers. Despite having been around since the late Jurassic, very little is known about the Galapagos Bullhead Shark. It has been classified as ‘Data Deficient’ under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the most dangerous category to be in.

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