GSC

New Publication from the Galapagos Science Center

Fernando J. Astudillo, from the Galapagos Science Center, is the author of the article “Soil phytoliths as indicators of initial human impact on San Cristóbal Island, Galápagos” published by Elsevier in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology.

Community Outreach

One of the fundamental pillars of the Galapagos Science Center (GSC) is the engagement with the community of San Cristobal and Galapagos in general. The problem is focused on that, traditionally, investigation in Galapagos has been done in a way where the community is separated from the research process; and in most cases, serving only as administrative support or for logistics. The intention of the GSC is to involve the local people through a process of participative research; at the same time prioritizing the training techniques and the process of investigation to students and public employees. Additionally, one of the missions of the GSC is to support the local institutions through applied investigation.

The Galapagos Bullhead Shark Project

Heterodontus quoyi goes by many names: in English it is known as the Galapagos Bullhead shark or the Peruvian Horn Shark (the latter because of it’s spines in front the first and second dorsal fin). It is one of the most elusive species of sharks that has recently come into the attention of researchers. Despite having been around since the late Jurassic, very little is known about the Galapagos Bullhead Shark. It has been classified as ‘Data Deficient’ under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, the most dangerous category to be in.

Evolution in motion…the on-going case of Darwin’s Finches

By. Diana Ochoa
[fusion_text]Darwin’s finches are some of the best-known species from the Galápagos Islands. They have helped us understand adaptive radiation, the process by which many species can arise from one original ancestor. In the Galápagos Islands, since the colonization of their nearest ancestor 2.75 MYA Darwin’s finches have radiated into the 14 separate species we know today.

Just another day in the life of the Galapagos Sea Lion

By. Diana Ochoa
For the Galápagos Sea Lion (GSL) living with humans is an every-day adventure. On the inhabited islands, some sea lions share their natural habitat with human settlements. This is particularly enchanting in Puerto Baquerizo Moreno on the island of San Cristóbal where a large reproductive colony around 500 strong dive, swim and sunbathe with residents and visitors. They are famously known for not being aggressive and no evolutionary fear of humans has really ever developed. But, could this be changing?

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